HISTORY OF BIRMINGHAM

 

Birmingham was settled as a part of Bloomfield Township in 1819. In 1836, a local foundry owner, Roswell Merrill, envisioned the community having a prosperous industrial future and proposed re-naming it after Birmingham, England, birthplace of the industrial revolution. This new name was adopted in 1838. It was not until 1864 that the Village of Birmingham was officially incorporated. In 1932, the village was incorporated as the City of Birmingham. 

 
Birmingham currently has a population of about 20,000, offering a sense of community along with the feel of an affluent urban area. The picturesque homes along tree lined streets give the privacy of a neighborhood while not being toofar away from the heart of downtown. Because of its beautiful surroundings, Birmingham was named one of the “Top 20 Most Walkable Communities

in the United States. Birmingham may be best known for its downtown shopping district, where among historical architectural buildings the downtown area has become to place to be seen.With two hours free parking, people can roam the nearly 300 upscale stores ranging from art galleries, unique clothing stores, salons, and numerous restaurants for a night on the town. Downtown Birmingham has two movie theaters, the Birmingham 8, built in 1927, and the Palladium, the premier movie theater in Metro Detroit. The Townsend Hotel located right downtown has become The Place to stay for in-town celebrities and fine dining alike.

 

Downtown Birmingham has attractions for all ages.There are eight elementary, two middle, and two high schools in the Birmingham Public School District. More than 98% of students graduate from high school in the district. Birmingham students also attend various prestigious private schools, like the nearby Detroit Country Day, Brother Rice, and Cranbrook high schools, which are among the highest rated schools in the state and have been attended by people such as Robin Williams, Chris Webber, Shane Battier, Mitt Romney, Bob Woodruff, and Selma Blair. The city prides itself on its great educational options and helping students achieve their dreams.

 

As a result, the residents are extremely well educated, with 30% having received a graduate degree.There are eight elementary, two middle, and two high schools in the Birmingham Public School District. More than 98% of students graduate from high school in the district. Birmingham students also attend various prestigious private schools, like the nearby Detroit Country Day, Brother Rice, and Cranbrook high schools, which are among the highest rated schools in the state and have been attended by people such as Robin Williams, Chris Webber, Shane Battier, Mitt Romney, Bob Woodruff, and Selma Blair. The city prides itself on its great educational options like Covington School (a public school with a waiting list to attend) and helping students achieve their dreams.

 

Birmingham places a great emphasis on culture and the arts, and hosts a variety of programs for the community. The city hosts a free public concert series in the summer "In the Park" series. Art is also prioritized, from the 24-foot-high bronze statue of artist Marshall Fredericks' "The Freedom of the Human Spirit" in downtown Birmingham's Shain Park, to a rotating public art project (one celebrated theme has been Tiger Town, honoring the nearby Detroit Tigers baseball team with painted tigers lining streets of downtown), and the annual Art in the Park festival held in Shain Park. For families, Birmingham puts on it famous First Night Birmingham event, a no-alcohol family-oriented celebration of the arts on New Year's Eve which attract people from across the state. The Woodward Dream Cruise also rolls through two miles of Woodward Avenue in Birmingham which brings the community together for a weekend where people line the street and eat at the restaurants and visit the stores while the classic cars cruise the road.

 

Getting around the area couldn’t be easier. With Woodward running through the city and numerous close connections to the highway, traveling about Metro Detroit is simple from Birmingham. Also unique to the city is it’s own Amtrak train stop, which has trains run twice a day in a line to Chicago’s Union Station, where trains can be caught to travel to the rest of the United States.

 

While Birmingham offers seemingly countless sources of entertainment, it is in the entertainment rich Oakland County, which is consistently among the wealthiest counties in America. The luxurious Somerset Mall is in neighboring Troy and the area is home to the Palace of Auburn Hills, where the Detroit Pistons and headlining musical acts play. Numerous other concert venues, like the DTE Energy Music Theater, Freedom Hill, and Meadowbrook Music Hall are all s short trip away.

Living in Birmingham has it all, the comfort of upscale suburban life, with a bustling downtown just minutes away where the whole family can spend a day shopping, eating, and at a movie. Birmingham is the place to live for young and old.